Aerial Care

Aerial Care Fixtures/Appliances

DO’s:

  • For cleaning stainless steel kitchen sink apply stainless steel cleaner/polish with a nonabrasive cloth or sponge, working with, not across, the grain.
  • Use glass ceramic cleaning cream to clean glass ceramic tops.
  • Replace range hood filters preferably every 6 months.
  • efill your dishwasher’s rinse aid dispenser about once per month.
  • Replace the refrigerator ice maker or water dispenser water filter at least every six months.
  • Perform regular defrosting of the refrigerator.
  • Fill up the refrigerator as it needs “thermal mass” (a.k.a. lots of stuff) to maintain low temperatures.
  • Use a shower squeegee to clean glass doors after showering to help prevent water spots.
  • Porcelain or ceramic bathtubs should be cleaned with a general purpose cleaner.
  • Know your faucet’s finish – check the manufacturer’s instructions for your faucet’s finish.
  • Always leave the door open when you are done with your washing.

 

DON’T:

  • Use steel wool, wire brushes or abrasive sponge pads to clean stainless steel kitchen sinks.
  • Submerge the burners or any electrical portion in water when cleaning electric coil burners.
  • Don’t leave your dishwasher out of operation for long time, use it regularly.
  • Do not use abrasive cleaners or chlorine bleach to clean porcelain sinks.
  • Never use bristle brushes, abrasive sponges or cleaners, or sharp instruments on the glass shower door panels or anodized aluminum.
  • Avoid using aerosol products on the bath surface.
  • Never use undiluted bleach on a porcelain tub because of the danger of pitting.
  • Never use products with acids, alkalis or abrasive components when cleaning toilet seats.
  • Do not use scrub sponges, abrasive brushes or abrasive cleaners to clean the bathroom/kitchen faucets.

 

Stainless Steel Kitchen Sinks

  • Clean stainless steel at least once a week.
  • Always apply stainless steel cleaner/polish with a nonabrasive cloth or sponge, working with, not across, the grain.
  • Do not use steel wool, wire brushes or abrasive sponge pads. Use only non-scratch cleaning pads.
  • Cleaners containing chloride (bleach) are not recommended. If used, rinse the surface immediately to prevent corrosion.
  • Most stainless steel products will scratch from everyday use. However, these scratches will blend over time to create a unique finish.
  • Do not store open containers of cleaners or chemicals such as acids, bleach, sodium chloride, lye, toilet bowl cleaner, drain cleaner, or hard water stain removal products under the sink.

 

Care Tip

 

Allowing water to evaporate on metal will form water deposits. To avoid this and keep your product looking beautiful, it is important to wipe the sink clean with a soft cloth after each use.

 

Cooktops & Range Hoods

 

Glass Ceramic Top

 

  • Make sure all controls are in the “OFF” position.
  • For normal, light soil: rub a few drops of a glass ceramic cleaning cream to the cool soiled area using a damp paper towel. Wipe until all soil and cream are removed. Frequent cleaning leaves a protective coating which is essential in preventing scratches and abrasions.
  • For heavy, burned soil: rub a few drops of glass ceramic cleaning cream to the cool soiled area using a damp paper towel. Carefully scrape remaining soil with a single-edged razor blade. Hold the blade at a 30° angle against the ceramic surface.
    If any soil remains, repeat the steps above. For additional protection, after all soil has been removed, polish the entire surface with the cleaning cream.
    Buff with a dry paper towel. As the cleaning cream cleans, it leaves a protective coating on the glass surface. This coating helps to prevent build-up of mineral deposits (water spots) and will make future cleaning easier.
    Note: Dishwashing detergents remove this protective coating and therefore, make the glass ceramic top more susceptible to staining.

Electric Coil Burners

  • Remove the completely cooled burners
  • Use a cleaning cloth and a mild dish soap and water to try to remove residue at first. Don’t submerge the burners or any electrical portion in water.
  • If mild dish soap and water wouldn’t remove stuck or burnt on food, try making a baking soda and water paste to gently scrub residue off of the electric burner coil. Really tough stains may benefit from allowing the baking soda paste to sit on the burner for up to 20 minutes, before scrubbing. Be sure to rinse thoroughly.
  • If your cook top has removable drip pans, this is the time to remove and clean those as well. Dump out any charred remnants of food. Wipe them down and replace them before replacing the burners.
  • For regular maintenance of electric coil burners, just wiped down the burners at the same time you wipe down the top of the stove.

 

Range Hoods

  • Charcoal filters should be replaced once every 6 months or as needed, according to usage
  • Aluminum and micromesh filters are removable without tools and dishwasher safe, using non-phosphate detergent. Using a detergent with phosphates, as the content of minerals in water, may cause filters discoloration, but this will not affect their filtration capability.
  • Blower wheel – first remove the inlet ring, and then gently pull down the blower wheel in order to remove it from the hood. Check with the producer if blower wheels and inlet rings are dishwasher safe.
  • Wash stainless steel surfaces with clean cloth or rag soaked in warm water and mild soap or liquid dish detergent. A specialised household stainless steel cleaner may also be used. Always clean in the direction of original polish lines.

Dishwashers

  • Remove the holders and racks
  • Clear any debris out of the holes in spinning arms.
  • Wipe around the edges of the door and around the gasket with damp cloth and mild spray cleaner or the vinegar solution
  • Remove mildew or mold with bleach by running a separate cycle from any used acid cleaners. Never mix bleach with other cleaners or with dishwasher detergent (avoid using bleach and detergents containing bleach if your dishwasher has a stainless steel interior or door).
  • Tackle rust stains by using a dishwasher-safe rust remover for the stains themselves, but seek out a professional to ask how they got there in the first place.
  • Clean thoroughly grate, filter, arms, and all the insides and place them back in as normal
  • Inspect the bottom of your dishwasher around the drain. Look for debris clogging up this area.
  • Remove any solid matter that builds up, especially bits of paper, shards of broken dishes, gravel, etc. If stuff has gotten down inside, you’ll have to do disassembly.
  • To remove accumulated debris, unplug the dishwasher. Carefully remove the screws at the bottom.
  • Use a cloth to remove solid debris and then scrub down the base as necessary. Screw everything back together and plug it back in.

Mastering Routine Maintenance

  • Use your dishwasher regularly.
  • Run a bit of hot water in your sink before running the dishwasher (set the thermostat on your water heater to 120F/50C)
  • Run the garbage disposal before starting the dishwasher.
  • Periodically run the dishwasher with vinegar by placing 2 cups of vinegar in the bottom of dishwasher and running it on low, or the energy-saving setting. Halfway through, stop the dishwasher and let the vinegar soak on the bottom for 15 or 20 minutes (if smell is an issue, sprinkle 1/2 – 1 cup of baking soda around the bottom and run the washer as normal).
  • Spray the front of your dishwasher with a mild spray cleaner. Wipe it down with a sponge or soft cloth.
  • Refill your dishwasher’s rinse aid dispenser about once per month
    Refrigerators
  • Weekly, use a cloth dampened by warm water and all-purpose cleaner to wipe down and remove crumbs and spills from shelves and walls. You can also use this cleaner on doors and handles.
  • For stainless-steel units use cleaning solution specially designed to remove dirt and fingerprints marks on stainless-steel refrigirators. While wiping, it’s best to follow the “grain” or pattern of the stainless steel.
  • Freshen and remove odors with a deodorizer that is specifically designed for refrigerators.
  • Use airtight containers to seal in odors and keep food fresher longer. If an item is weakly packaged (i.e. fruit cartons) or simply likely to leak (i.e. defrosting meat), place it on a plate before storing.
  • Replace the ice maker or water dispenser water filter at least every six months.
  • Perform regular defrosting – when frost has accumulated on the inside walls of the freezer remove the food from the refrigerator/freezer, turn off the thermostat or unplug the unit, and allow all of the frost to melt. Once the frost has melted completely, wipe out the water, turn the unit back on, wait for it to reach its operating temperature, and restock it with food.
  • If you have a self-defrosting refrigerator, you don’t need to do anything.
    Mastering Routine Maintenance
  • Check the door seals. Clean them about twice a year, using a toothbrush and a solution of baking soda and water.
  • Keep the coils clean. Twice a year, pull the machine from the wall to reveal the coils in back (or snap off the grille, if the coils are on the bottom front), unplug the refrigerator, and vacuum with the brush attachment.
  • Set the right temperature and keep the fridge between 37 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit and the freezer at 0 degrees.
  • Fill it up as the refrigerators need “thermal mass” (a.k.a. lots of stuff) to maintain low temperatures
  • If the power goes out, keep the doors closed and use foods from the pantry. An unopened refrigerator will keep food safe for four hours; a freezer will maintain its temperature for 48 hours if full and 24 hours if half-full.

Porcelain Sinks

  • Porcelain kitchen/bathroom should be cleaned with a general purpose cleaner.
  • Do not use abrasive cleaners or chlorine bleach.
  • Very easy way to keep white sink looking bright and shiny without using bleach, is to spray sink with Hydrogen peroxide and leave it working overnight. Then sprinkle baking soda over the scuff marks, leave it to work for 3 minutes, rinse down and wipe out.
  • You can also use so called “Porcelain Repair Kit”.
  • Remember that a porcelain sink will always get scratches and the kitchen sink is the most vulnerable. Using rubber sink mats on the bottom is a good way to reduce scratches.

Shower Door

  • Wipe down shower doors regularly with a soft cloth and water or a squeegee to keep the glass looking clean.
  • Do not use abrasive cleaners.
  • Use a shower squeegee to clean glass doors after showering to help prevent water spots.
  • To avoid soap deposits or lime buildup in hard water areas, wipe the door dry after each use.
  • Occasionally wipe the doors with a mild detergent diluted in water to keep the door looking new.
  • Never use bristle brushes, abrasive sponges or cleaners, or sharp instruments on the glass panels or anodized aluminum. They can scratch some glass and metal surfaces.
  • For metal surfaces, never use cleaners containing abrasives, ammonia, bleach, acids, waxes, alcohol or solvents as they may damage the finish. Use of harsh cleaning agents may void warranty obligations.
  • Do not let cleaners soak on surfaces.
  • Rinse and wipe fixtures after cleaning to prevent soap buildup.

 

Care Tip

 

Keep shower doors ajar and enclosures open so that air can circulate to reduce mildew growth.

 

Baths, Shower Trays & Whirlpools

  • Wipe out bath/tray/whirlpool after each use with soft cloth or squeegee.
  • Porcelain or ceramic bathtubs should be cleaned with a general purpose cleaner. You can also try white vinegar and water or a paste made from baking soda and water. Never use undiluted bleach on a porcelain tub because of the danger of pitting.
  • Acrylic and fiberglass tubs do not have pores in them so they’re easy to keep clean with a small amount of neutral soap or detergent and water. Wipe the surface of the tub with a soft cloth for ongoing maintenance.
  • Do not use abrasive cleaners.
  • Avoid using aerosol products on the bath surface.

 

Care Tip

 

To restore dull or scratched units: Apply white automotive polishing compound with a clean cloth. Rub scratches and dull areas vigorously. Wipe off residue. Follow with a coat of white automotive paste wax.
Note: do not wax areas where you walk or stand.

 

How to flush your whirlpool

  • Flush your whirlpool system twice a month or more, depending upon usage.
  • Adjust the jets fully clockwise so there is no air induction.
  • Fill the bath with warm water to a level 2″ above the highest jets, or leave water in the bath after using.
  • Add 2 teaspoons of a low-foaming, powder automatic dishwashing detergent and 20 ounces of household bleach (5% to 6% sodium hypochlorite) to the water.
  • Run the whirlpool for 5 to 10 minutes. Then shut off the whirlpool and drain the water.

 

Vitreous China Toilets & Bidets

 

Toilets

  • For cleaning toilet seat just use water and mild soap solution or detergent. Never use products with acids, alkalis or abrasive components.
  • Dry the hinges and the seat with a soft cloth to remove any residue and stains.
  • Soft abrasive cleaners may be used when necessary to clean vitreous china products. Strong abrasive cleaners will scratch and dull the surface.
  • Most toilet bowl cleaners are safe to use on vitreous china. Follow label directions and use toilet bowl cleaners on the inside of the bowl only.
  • Do not use in-tank toilet cleaners as they can damage the flush valve or other working parts.
  • Wipe any splashes of cleaner solutions from plastic or plated surfaces immediately.

 

Care Tip

 

Over time, hard water deposits may clog toilet rim holes and trap ways. To clean, purchase a commercial cleaner that’s recommended for the removal of hard water deposits. Follow all instructions on the package.

 

Bidets

  • A bidet toilet seat should be cleaned just like a regular toilet seat. Use warm water and soap or specially designed disinfectant cleaner. Check with the manufacturer/supplier regarding the cleaner to be used for particular unit.
  • Most electric bidet toilet seat models use a wireless remote control which operates with batteries. These have to be replaced when and as needed. It is important to use the right type of batteries and not to mix old with new ones.
  • The water which is used for washing is typically filtered. Some models use mesh filters which do not require replacement but have to be cleaned – this is usually done by placing the filter under running water. Follow the cleaning instructions provided by the manufacturer.
  • Some of the filters eventually lose their efficiency and have to be replaced. Check the instructions provided by the manufacturer to find out how often the filters have to be replaced and how.
  • The bidet toilet seats with deodorizing system typically use carbon filters, which work to make the air that goes through them clean and fresh. These filters have to be replaced as and when required by the manufacturer so that the deodorizer can continue to work properly.
  • Check the bided water hoses once per year

Bathroom and kitchen faucets

  • Know your faucet’s finish – check the manufacturer’s instructions for your faucet’s finish. While the most common type of faucet is chrome, there are other types that may need special care instructions.
  • Most basic way to clean faucet is to use plain water, or mild dish soap and water. Drying the faucet with a dry cleaning cloth after cleaning will allow to buff the shine of the faucet. This will also help prevent spotting on the faucet finish.
  • Do not use scrub sponges, abrasive brushes or abrasive cleaners.

 

Care Tip

 

To make your chrome faucets gleam and shine, try putting a dab of baby oil on a cotton ball and polish the faucet with the oil.

 

Washers/Dryers

 

Washers

  • The washing machine should be cleaned ideally once per month.
  • I you have a newer machine you might even have a self-cleaning cycle already.
  • Consult your machine’s manual for instructions on how to clean your machine.
  • You can also clean the Machine Interior with two cycles. Cycle One – with an empty washing machine, add in about two cups of baking soda directly into the washing machine which is going to gently scrub the inside and combat the odors. Run a large, long, hot water cycle. If your machine has a self-clean cycle, use it.
  • Cycle Two – add in 2 cups of plain white vinegar. Run another cycle through and set it to the longest, hottest and biggest setting. Once both cycles are complete, give a quick wipe down to the drum and agitator using a cotton cloth. Any stains can be removed with paste of baking soda and water.
  • Clean Machine Exterior, Door (inside and outside)and Dispensing Trays with all-purpose cleaner. Scrub grimy areas where necessary with a cleaning toothbrush (and baking soda, if needed) and wipe everything clean with a cotton cloth. If possible, soak dispensing trays and then wipe clean.
  • Always leave the door open when you are done with your washing.

Dryers

  • Clean your dryer every 6 – 12 months depending on usage.
  • Consult your dryer’s manual for instructions on how to clean your machine.
  • Unplug dryer and empty lint trap. You can also take the discharge hose out from the back of the dryer and give it a good shake to remove any debris.
  • Unscrew the back panel and pop it off. Vacuum the space and use a brush attachment or a crevice tool to get into any difficult areas. Vacuum the lint trap itself.
  • Vacuum anything left behind in the drum too.
  • Give it a quick wipedown using an all-purpose cleaner and a cotton cloth and put everything back together including panels, hoses and plug it back in.

 

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