Aerial Care

Aerial CARE Stone/Tile

DO’s:

  • Protect stone from common household acidic liquids such as vinegar, lemon juice, coffee and red wine.
  • Clean up spills on stone immediately.
  • Use coasters under glasses and trivets or mats under hot dishes and cookware on your stone kitchen countertops.
  • Use place mats under china, ceramics, silver and other objects that can scratch the stone’s surface.
  • Remove and replace any damaged or broken tile only by a qualified tile contractor.
  • Clean glazed ceramic tiles regularly with an all-purpose, non-oil-based household cleaner that’s compatible with cleaning grout joints.
  • For cleaning unglazed ceramic tiles use concentrated tile cleaners that have a neutral pH for regular cleaning.
  • Clean the porcelain tile & grout using warm water, neutral cleaner specially formulated for porcelain tile & grout and a nonabrasive cloth sponge or mop.
  • Vacuum or dust mop frequently the stone floors to remove abrasive agents from the stone surface.
  • Only use cleaners specifically designed for cleaning stone tiles.

 

DON’T:

  • Use vinegar, bleach, ammonia or other general-purpose cleaners for the stone surface.
  • Use abrasive cleaners for stone surface.
  • Place toiletry products directly on the countertop surface, use a tray for such products in your bathroom.
  • Use harsh cleaning aids like steel wool pads or any scouring pads containing metal should not be used on tile.
  • Use wax-based cleaners and oil-based detergents for tiles cleaning and use sealants on grout joints only.
  • Clean unglazed ceramic tile with an agent that contains color.
  • Do not use ordinary household cleaners for porcelain tiles as it may degrade the sealer that was applied to the grout to protect against stains.
  • Use cleaners for stone tiles that contain acid or bleach.
  • Drag furniture on mosaic tile floor.

 

STONE

Marble

  • Marble is prone to marking because of its calcium carbonate makeup, which reacts with any acid. Acid eats away a tiny bit of the surface, creating dull spots, also known as etches.
  • Clean marble with warm water and gentle non-abrasive dish soap. Don’t use anything with acid or lemon juice. Wipe with a hot, wet dish cloth and dry with an absorbent towel.

Granite

  • Use warm water, a mild or gentle dish soap, and a nubby washcloth or microfiber cloth for daily wipedowns.
  • Don’t use harsh or abrasive cleaners and sponges, Windex, acidic cleaners like vinegar, lemon, lime, or anything with ammonia or bleach.
    Caesarstone
  • Use soap and water or a mild detergent to maintain its luster.
  • If necessary, apply common, non-abrasive, household cleaners directly on a damp cloth or sponge and wipe the surface, rinsing thoroughly after cleaning.
  • To remove adhered material such as food, gum, or nail polish, first scrape away the excess material with a plastic putty knife and then clean the surface with a damp cloth to remove any marks left behind and any residual dirt.
    Silestone
  • The natural quartz in silestone makes it the toughest interior surface available on the market. Nevertheless, do avoid excessive force or pressure because that may mar or chip the surface and avoid harsh chemicals.
  • Use mild household cleaner. In case of stubborn spills or stains, soak the area for up to 10 minutes with the cleaner and vigorously wipe away with a non scratch pad.
    Limestone
  • It can be easily scratched, damaged by heat, and etched by acidic substances.
  • Do not use strong cleaning products that do not have a neutral pH as they break down the surface of limestone. A mild dish soap can be used but you might want to pick up a soap designed specifically for limestone.
  • Never use generic tile products, bathroom cleaners, glass cleaners, or abrasives to remove stains from limestone.
    Soapstone
  • Use dishwashing liquid and warm water, let either air dry or wipe dry with a soft towel.
  • For periodic maintenance use a small amount of mineral oil onto cloth and rub the mineral oil onto the soapstone surface. After the oiling wipe away the excess so that the surface will not feel slick. During the first year of using the soapstone surface, this should be done about every two weeks to help the stone oxidize (darken) evenly. Thereafter, it should be done about every two months.

Travertine

  • Is sensitive to acidic substances (juice, wine, coffee) so it can etch (dull the polish) rather easily just like marble and limestone.
  • Blot up spills immediately.
  • The only cleaning agents you should use on a regular basis are hot water and a specially formulated stone cleaner/sealer.
  • Don’t use generic, store-bought cleaning products of any kind. Don’t use generic bathroom, tub & tile or grout cleaners.


Onyx

  • Onyx is soft and calcium-based and it will react with common household acidic liquids such as vinegar, lemon juice, coffee and red wine.
  • Don’t use any homemade cleaners, glass/window cleaner, or normal kitchen countertop cleaners, as these could be too acidic.
  • Do not use abrasive cleaners.
  • Use natural cleaning products with a neutral pH and a soft cloth. Gel Gloss is sometimes recommended.

Sandstone

  • Clean surfaces regularly with stone professional cleaner and revitalizers specially designed for the sandstone.
  • Don’t use vinegar, bleach, ammonia or other general-purpose cleaners and abrasive cleaners.
  • Sandstone is very porous and the best way to prevent stains is to treat the surface with a protective sealer. The sealer fills in the pores and repels spills on the surface, allowing time to completely wipe it away.

Caesarstone

  • Caesarstone has a high density and non-porous qualities therefore all you need to do is thoroughly rinse off the soap/mild detergent with hot water after use and dry with soft cloth or paper towel. You may also use a combination of 50/50 vinegar & water, rinsing afterwards.
  • Use a non-abrasive cleaner to avoid dulling the surface shine. Avoid exposure to strong chemicals and solvents.
  • For removing stubborn food stains apply a generous amount of a non-abrasive gel , such as Soft Scrub Liquid Gel with Bleach, to a damp soft cloth or paper towel (not directly on to the countertop). Wipe the area using a circular motion, rinsing thoroughly with water and dry with soft cloth or paper towel.
  • When removing metal marks/rust which requires abrasive cleaner, use for spot cleaning ONLY. Place small amount on damp cloth and by using very light pressure, wipe the area in a circular motion, rinsing thoroughly with warm water and dry with soft cloth or paper towel.
  • To remove dried spills (adhered material) such as food, gum or nail polish, first carefully scrape away the excess material with a plastic putty knife and then clean the surface with a damp cloth to remove any marks left behind and any residual dirt. Do not use any abrasive pads to clean tougher dirt as abrasives can damage the finish/sheen of your countertops.

TILES

  • For basic maintenance – sweep or vacuum floors to remove any dust or debris before using any cleaning products. Damp-mop your tile floor at least once each week (more frequently for heavy traffic areas) to decrease wear and abrasion from grit and soil.
  • After cleaning, rinse the entire area with clear water to remove any cleaning solution residue.
  • Avoid any cleaners containing acid or bleach for routine maintenance.
  • Avoid wax-based cleaners and oil-based detergents, and use sealants on grout joints only.
  • Harsh cleaning aids like steel wool pads or any scouring pads containing metal should not be used on tile.
  • For extra protection invest in high-quality floor mats and protective pads under heavy furniture for an extra layer of protection to your tile floors. Place floor mats at entrances and exits to collect and trap corrosive substances. Placing mats in high-traffic areas—in front of vanities, kitchen sinks, and stoves—is an effective way to reduce tile wear.
  • Use a sealer on grout joints shortly after installation and use products compatible with cleaning grout joints.
  • Have any damaged or broken tile removed and replaced only by a qualified tile contractor.

Ceramic Tiles & Grout

Glazed Ceramic Tiles

  • Clean regularly with an all-purpose, non-oil-based household cleaner that’s compatible with cleaning grout joints.
  • Use an everyday multipurpose spray cleaner to remove soap scum, hard water deposits, and mildew on wall tiles in your bath or shower.

Unglazed (Quarry) Ceramic Tiles

  • Use concentrated tile cleaners that have a neutral pH for regular cleaning. These will safely remove grease, oils, and normal spills—just check to be sure the cleaner is intended for the application, use, and traffic level.
  • Clean glass tile with any nonabrasive cleaner recommended for either glass or tile.
  • Unglazed tile should not be cleaned with an agent that contains color.

Porcelain Tiles & Grout

  • Clean the porcelain tile & grout using warm water and a clean nonabrasive cloth sponge or mop.
  • Use a neutral cleaner that is specially formulated for porcelain tile & grout.
  • Do not use ordinary household cleaners, as you may degrade the sealer that was applied to the grout to protect against stains.
  • When heavy duty grout cleaning is required, you will need to use a professional strength Tile & Grout Cleaner that is capable of removing grease, soap scum, body oil, mildew stains, algae, and synthetic or acrylic waxes from the grout joints. However, such a product should contain non-polluting chemicals and low VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) levels.
  • When grout has been stained to the point that it cannot be maintained or returned to its natural color, you can return the grout back to its original color or any other color through the use of a “grout stain”. Grout Stains are epoxy-based products that are specifically designed to penetrate into the grout and seal the surface with a permanent color.

Natural Stone Tiles

  • Natural stone requires a different maintenance routine than traditional, man-made ceramic tile.
  • Many of the cleaners acceptable for use on ceramic tile can stain, damage or dull stone. Dirt and dust will scratch the surface of stone.
  • Stone floors should be vacuumed or dust mopped frequently to remove abrasive agents from the stone surface.
  • Only use cleaners specifically designed for cleaning stone.
  • Natural stone should be cleaned with neutral cleaners.
  • Stone cleaners should never contain acid or bleach. Acids, even a light solution of vinegar and water, will etch and eventually damage natural stone.
  • Once the stone has been cleaned, you can periodically apply a Spray-Buff wax-type floor finish to enhance the beauty and luster of polished stone (including countertops). Apply the finish with a spray applicator and buff immediately with a white nylon pad.

Mosaics

 

  • Whether wiping down counters, backsplashes, showers, bath surrounds or floors, use a mild detergent and water. Read the manufacturer directions for your specific mosaic tile product, as they will say how potent the cleaning agent should be.
  • Use a soft sponge or cloth, and avoid hard-bristled tools, as these can scratch your mosaic tiles. Rinse off the surface of your mosaic tiles and dry them with a cloth.
  • You can vacuum your mosaic tile floors to keep them clean if you prefer that over sweeping.
  • Mopping mosaic floors can help keep them looking beautiful. Sweep the floors first, using a broom with soft bristles. Then, use a pH neutral cleaner and water to mop the floors. You should let the cleaning agent sit on the floors for about five to 10 minutes before scrubbing with the mop. When you are done, rinse thoroughly and remove excess liquid.
  • Don’t drag furniture on mosaic tile floor.

Care tips for pool mosaics

  • If you have mosaic tiles in your pool, they will require special cleaning.
  • Along with a regular maintenance schedule, you will need to do a deeper clean once a year at the beginning or end of the season.
  • Since a dry surface is easier to scrub, drain the water and let the pool dry. You can use a mixture of baking soda and water and scrub the area with a stiff sponge or scrub brush. Rubbing in a circular motion should help remove the marks.
  • Once your pool is free of stains, clean as you would other mosaic tile, with a mild detergent and water.

 

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